Category Archives: books

Errand Girl of the Undead, Open for Business!

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Happy book birthday to The Trouble with Werewolves! For a short story, it certainly took me a long time to get this one out into the world.  I think a lot of the reasoning was because I wasn’t completely done with the series and wanted to hold off. I’m still not done (the 3rd book is nearing completion but has a ways to go yet) but I figured if I published then it would push me to get it done.

I really enjoyed writing this story, I think because Ellie’s a tough chick but with a definitely vulnerable side to her. She’s had an interesting upbringing but still wanted to be “normal”. Like most teens, she is trying to find herself, love, and a great pair of jeans to highlight her ass…ets.

I hope you enjoy her antics as much as I enjoyed writing about them!

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Ellie Weston may look like a blonde Barbie wanna-be, but call by her full name of Elvira and you’ll find she can take you down with nothing more than a paperclip and a hair tie. Having been raised by an ancient vampire, a faerie and a demon hardly makes her a normal teen. She’s trained in self-defense, with a bit of magic thrown in, but those talents are going to waste as she picks up dry cleaning, walks three-headed dogs and collects grave dust by the light of the full moon.

Her job as an errand girl to the undead–and other paranormal creatures–has kept her busy and relatively safe, until she receives a job to hunt down a rogue werewolf who is brutally butchering norms in her father’s territory. As she tries to track down the bloodthirsty beast, she finds the clues aren’t quite adding up. Will her wiles be enough to keep her safe and solve the mystery, or will she become the next victim of these ghastly crimes?

 

Pick up a copy for 99 cents!

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Trouble-Werewolves-Errand-Girl-Undead-ebook/dp/B01CC5FSF2

Nook: pending (check back!)

Does Banning Books Really Keep Kids From Reading Them?

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When a book is banned and not allowed in schools or even the library, it can make the avid reader even more eager to hunt down a copy for themselves to see what all the hype is about. In this day and age, it’s very easy for many to get their hands on those books, whether it’s e-books that can be borrowed imageor purchased online or physical copies that can be picked up at the local book store.   Personally, there was only one book my mother forbid me to read, Flowers in the Attic. I found a copy for 10 cents at a yard sale (sans the cover…) which I picked up and read without my folks ever knowing.  At the time, I didn’t see what the big deal was. Sure there was some adult themes: incest, murder, etc.but I understood it was just fiction and not a real story. As an adult I can see why my mother found it so awful. How could a mother, fictional or not, do such an awful thing to her kids?

Adults can see topics in a different light than someone who is younger. While they might see Harry Potter as promoting witchcraft, a teen reader sees a coming of age, fantastical story that just happens to include some cool magic stuff. While they might wish they could be like Harry, I doubt they’re running out looking for their own owls and books on how to become a wizard.

I do think it’s important to know what your kids are reading and if the themes are currently too mature for them, but to broadly ban books is only going to push the avid reader to find some way to get their hands on it. In the day and age of internet, video games and phones that do just about anything, be happy your child/teen is still picking up books and wants to throw themselves into worlds they have to imagine on their own.

What are your thoughts on banned books?

Feed Your Brain, As Well As Your Body

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imageThere’s lots of talk about feeding body and soul, about being healthy and putting the right stuff in to get good stuff out, but what about feeding the brain? There have been studies to say that keeping an active mind helps one to keep sharp as they age. There are even websites like Lumosity that use games to help keep the brain working.

In 2013, Huffington Post had an article stating that a survey was presented to 1,000 adults and the results show that 28% of the population had not read a book in the past year. Another 25% only read between 1 and 5 books in the previous year. Only 8% stated they had read over 50 books in the past year.

Now I understand people are busy and not a whole lot of us have the time for 50 books in a year (ahh I miss my years of reading between 150-200 books a year…). I get TV watching is relaxing and easier for most. I’m no stranger to couch potato ways and I’m quite familiar with binge watching shows on Netflix (although I pride myself in not getting one of those “You’ve been watching for X amt of hours, are you okay?” messages…). While you can certainly learn things from television, especially if you’re watching an educational kind of show (Shark Week, anyone?)  reading will work a different part of the brain.

Have you ever been excited to see one of your favorite books is being turned into a movie, but then are disappointed with the outcome? That main character looks nothing like you imagined.  That town? You expected it to look more desolate and rundown. Why? Because when you read the book your brain took the author’s words and worked up an image in your mind about what those characters looked like and how that town was depicted.  Your image may not exactly mirror the one the author had in mind, but that’s okay.  The perk of reading is that you get to visit and visualize new worlds and people in your own way. You are using your imagination, something that many seem to forget they have once they enter the Tween years.  To be imaginative is not a downfall. It’s not childish or immature. It’s creative, artistic, and good for the mind, body and soul.

Reading not only feeds your brain but gives you things to discuss and debate with other likeminded folks.  It can help you turn a non-reader onto something amazing. It can inspire you to create art, fan fiction and all sorts of other projects based on the world you step into when you flip through those pages.

Newspaper and magazine articles and non-fiction books certainly feed your brain as well, but fiction allows for the imagination to spark and grow ideas and images to accompany an author’s story. If you’re going to be health conscious, be sure to feed all aspects of the body, including the all important brain!

How many books do your feed your brain with in a year?

Path of Angels – Book 2 – Zadekiel Interview

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ZadekielPoACoverIt’s here, the second story in the Path of Angels series by Patricia Josephine! I enjoyed the character interview with Michael from book one so  I decided to have another with the star of book two, Zadekiel.  Enjoy and keep reading for a blurb, buy links and info on the awesome author!

 

Q: Let’s start with the basics. Tell us a bit about yourself and what makes you tick.

Zade: I am a reincarnated archangel. I’m also a middle child with sisters. My oldest sister and I hardly ever got along and our mother was always separating us.

Q: Do you have any hobbies, favorite TV shows, books? Anything you fangirl/boy over?

Zade: I enjoyed school and worked hard at it. Any good book is appreciated, but I do love it when they make them into movies. I like seeing the images before me that were once only in my head. Sometimes they are the same, sometimes not.

Q: What is one thing from your past you’re most proud of?

Zade: My grades in school. Given that our town is so small and my father, people always expected me to fail. I worked hard to earn all As and prove them that I wasn’t going to end up a thug.

Q: Let’s play favorites:

Pepsi or Coke?

Zade: Neither. I like water. It’s refreshing.

Pie or Cake?

Zade: It depends on the pie. Apple, hell yes. Pecan? Give me the cake.

White or dark chocolate?

Zade: Have you seen my skin? Dark chocolate is the best. *winks*

Playstation 4 or Xbox 1or WiiU?

Zade: Xbox1 all the way.

Paperback book or ebook?

Zade: Ebooks are nice because I can bring a hundred of them in one small device. Although, hunting fallen angels means there’s not much time for reading.

Summer or winter?

Zade: Summer. I find the sun to be invigorating and you don’t get that as much in the wintertime.

Puppies or kittens?

Zade: Kittens. They’re so tiny and fuzzy and then they grow up to be complete nightmares that think they own you.

Vampires or werewolves?

Zade: Zombies. They are far easier to battle. One shot to the head.

 

Blurb:

The path is lost.

With Michael gone, the mantle of leadership falls to Zadekiel. In this time of darkness, with tempers running short, Zade struggles to guide his brothers. Hope comes in the form of a green haired woman with a unique gift. She represents a way back to the path they lost when Michael disappeared.

Zephyr fills books with cryptic poetry, a powerful compulsion, which is more a curse than a blessing. With no control over her ability, she struggles to live a normal life. When she meets Zade, he insists her ability is a gift from God. Reluctantly, she agrees to join the cause–it’s hard to dispute a man with wings.

Now the path is found, but one question remains. Will it lead to further darkness?

 

Amazon Link

Goodreads Link

 

PatriciaLynneAuthorPic2About the Author:

Patricia Josephine never set out to become a writer. In fact, she never considered it an option during high school and college. She was all about art. On a whim, she wrote down a story bouncing in her head. That was the start of it and she hasn’t regretted a moment. She writes young adult under the name Patricia Lynne.

 

Patricia lives with her husband in Michigan, hopes one day to have what will resemble a small petting zoo, has a fondness for dying her hair the colors of the rainbow, and an obsession with Doctor Who.

 

 

 

Links:

Twitter

Website

Google+

Wattpad

Goodreads

 

 

Where is the comparative YA lit?

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book heartFor those that don’t know, my degree is not in English, but Comparative Literature and Languages. I read a good deal of world literature and found similarities and differences in style, characters, etc. (see my senior essay on how Russian lit influenced modern Japanese lit here!). I was recently discussing my degree with someone and it got me thinking that I don’t read a whole lot of works by non-American authors these days (unless I don’t realize they’re not American. Maybe I’m naively assuming they’re all American!).

I tried to do some Googling of best selling non-American YA authors but not a whole lot comes up. I found this list which has the very obvious JK Rowling and Cornelia Funk but I don’t recognize a lot of the other authors and some of the titles are very dated and strike me as odd to be considered YA (Crime and Punishment?!).

I know a lot of American titles make it across the Pond and onto Europe but I’m curious if they make it over to the Middle East and Asian countries as well. Do we get their work translated here as well? I think an influx of stories dealing with teens in different cultures could really be beneficial to young readers, especially in helping to banish racism and coming to learn that different doesn’t mean bad. I know there is a push in American YA lit for characters of color and minorities but I’d love to see the stories actually coming from different cultures where the authors have first hand accounts of the lifestyles, rituals and taboos there.

With a little more Google-fu, I found some other lists and articles that I will definitely be checking out!

Different but worthwhile foreign YA fiction translated to English
The Power of Foreign Young Adult Literature

Do you have a favorite non-American YA author? What are some of your favorite foreign stories?